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Will Vegetarian or Vegan Diet help me meet my goals?

I am intrigued by everything I'm learning about vegetarianism or veganism recently, but I'm still not sure it is for me. Many years ago, I was a vegetarian, but I concede I might not have been doing it "right". I relied on a lot of pre-packaged foods, soy and not enough variety of fruits and vegetables. My skin became dry, patchy and with cystic acne. I gained a lot of weight as well.

 

I also struggled a great deal with the impact on my social and familial relationships as I adopted a vegetarian diet. One Thanksgiving, my former IL's served us iceberg lettuce and deep friend tofu while everyone else enjoyed turkey and all the traditional trimmings. I don't think they were intending to be malicious, rather, they just didn't know what to serve those who eat "rabbit food.' I'm not so sure I'm willing to let my diet become a problem or difficulty when visiting friends and family.

 

Also, I felt like it took a lot of mental energy to maintain a vegetarian diet. I was always thinking about where meat was hiding in my food. Is it easier today to have a more normal life while vegetarian?

 

I've read a few entries here in the community where women have been gaining weight when they follow the Thrive diet. That would be counterproductive considering I need to lose a pretty significant amount of weight (70-80 lbs). I also have my heart set on getting into great shape, though I'm not sure if I would be interested in competitive sports. I'd like to be strong, yet flexible and fit enough to return to both ashtanga yoga and martial arts (MMA, Muay Thai). I am preparing to begin P90, and then P90X in about 2 weeks.

 

I'm not sure if I should try to lose weight before transitioning to a vegetarian/vegan diet, or if transitioning will aid me in weight loss. I don't know if I can stick 100% to a vegetarian or vegan diet - I think I might make a better "flexitarian" unless there are adverse effects to adding the occasional poultry or fish dish to my diet to satisfy social conventions.

 

I'm also concerned about cost. It seems, at least common sense would suggest that a vegetarian/vegan diet is much cheaper than buying an omnivorous diet. Has that been everyone's experience? Or do you spend more on groceries now that you've made the switch?

Tags: P90, P90X, diet, expense, loss, transitioning, vegan, weight

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I was kinda in your spot a little over a year ago. I Lost about 65 lbs running, lifting and doing mma while on a less than healthy mostly carb/ meat diet so I swithched to vegetarian. I then met my girlfriend in november and shes vegan so I decided to try it. I fully commited to being vegan on new years. I gave up smoking and energy drinks/ coffee the same time. I went from 235Lbs to about 170 with bad food. Now I'm on my 4th week of p90x and vegan comin in at about 155lbs and getting ripped. I spend as much a week on healthy food for 3meals a day as I did eating fast food for lunch every day at work. Luckily quiting smoking saved me enough money to pay for my supplements and vega sport protein so really I spend about the same a month to be in the best shape of my life. I have soo much energy and mental/ physical strength. My cardio is insane and muscle recovery is astonishing. I'm about 80% raw vegan and still tweaking my diet every week to get the best results. I'm getting back into mma as well. I learned to bring my own food to social events haha my family and friends are used to it now. Feel free to ask me any specific questions I'll help you the best I can

Thank you so much for your very helpful replies.

I've been chatting with some other friends, who are to my surprise, mostly vegetarian or vegan. One friend, whose wife is an Ayurvedic doctor says he is a Flexitarian - eating veg meals about 95% of the time and only having poultry or fish very occasionally.

Another female friend of mine told me she has dropped 4-5 dress sizes and over 45 lbs. simply by eating a mostly vegan diet - only having dairy occasionally when eating out.

I think that is do-able. When I tried vegetarianism years ago, I was very strict (obviously eating the deep friend tofu and iceberg lettuce "salad" meant I was very strict!) and didn't allow for deviation in my diet, even when it would have been in my best interest.

I suppose I will have to eat more or tweak my diet in other ways when I really get going with intense workouts. The only other hurdle to overcome will be to get the partner to be okay with veggie diet. I'm also interested in eliminating gluten, caffeine and sugar.

 

 

Hi,

I read your post with great interest.  I picked up the Thrive Diet back in October and starting following it 80%.  I went through a horrible detox phase the first week but then my entire life changed.  I felt great!  I had a TON of energy, I slept very well, I had very little anxiety,  I thought more clearly and my skin and hair looked amazing!  And, I lost weight and felt very, very light.  I don't really need to lose weight but it was a perk!!  I do eat eggs one day a week and we have red meat one night a week.  I also have my daily coffee.  If I was super strict, I would not stick with it but this balance really works for me, and it works for my body.  I have a 3 year old who is happy to eat whatever I am eating too and I like that it feels so nutritious! The only downside is that I am getting bored with the Thrive diet recipes and am now looking at investing in a dehydrator!  You will feel great if you do this.  It will shock you at how great you feel!  And as for family dinners, I do sometimes bring my own food.  At Christmas time, I ate everything though and that's where the 80/20% comes in!!!  Good luck!

Hi There. After reading your post I have one burning question...why do you want to be veg???

 

As someone who has been veg most of his life, here is my experience and thoughts: 

 

a) The only people who stick to a veg diet are those whose choices are rooted in strong beliefs. 

b) You can be veg and be very, very unhealthy. Veg means you don't eat meat. It doesn't automatically mean you eat healthy. 

c) If you're concerned about what people think, give up now. Seriously. Most people are threatened by things that are foreign to them and their defense mechanism is to attack, or at the very least, question it.

d) If you want to do veg right, you have to educate yourself about nutrition. Actually, let me rephrase that...If you want to be healthy, whether you're veg or not, you have to educate yourself about nutrition. 

e) If you carry the right veg diet, you will be able to eat all you want and not gain weight. Tested and proven. Period.

f) You will get sick only when you ingest things that are not healthy for you. If you start eating the right diet and then eat something toxic, you will get sick. Simple logic. 

g) Lastly in regards to cost, you're not looking at the big picture. If you adopt the right veg diet, you are INVESTING in avoiding diseases like heart disease, diabetes and cancer. How much does your health cost? 

 

Here's some advice: 

 

a) Think deeply about why you want to pursue a veg diet. 

b) Understand that if you want health, you will have to educate yourself. I'm in my 30s and have been at it for decades now. I'm still learning. 

c) Stop giving a sh*t about what other people think. In time, when you start looking younger, healthier and are able to outperform "regular" people in various capacities, not just physical, I can assure you those questions or concerns will subdue. And as an FYI, it's not rabbit food, it's gorilla food! 

d) If you eat a diet primarily based of raw fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts and sprouted legumes with some added super foods, you will look and feel like superman. You will not be overweight, you won't have skin blemishes, you won't feel tired...you will achieve your perfect weight, you will have radiant skin and will start looking younger than ever, you will sleep 5-6 hours and have abundant energy throughout the day with no flat spots and you will have much greater mental clarity and a much higher sense of emotional wellbeing.  

e) There is no free lunch. You have to lean how to look at what you eat as fuel and not the addiction to the palate that it is for most people. You have to invest time to educate yourself. You have to not care what people think and stand by your beliefs. 

 

I hope that helps. 

Hi LJ,

I appreciate your note, and thought you deserved a direct answer to your questions and thoughts.

 

"After reading your post I have one burning question...why do you want to be veg???"

I have several macro-level reasons for wanting to go veg. Some may sound a little "weird" but here it is:

1. Health Reasons - I really want to be in peak physical condition. I am preparing for a physically demanding career and am frankly sick and tired of being fat, tired, and in pain.

2. Mental Clarity - I practice yoga, and let's face it, most of the yoga teachers and paths recommend a veg diet, if not outright demand it. I love the freedom from the emotional and mental ups and downs that yoga brings me - I want to see if a veg diet will further enhance those benefits.

3. Environmental Concerns - I have read plenty of articles from Vegetarian Times and lots of books like "Diet for a New America" that have convinced me that a veg diet is kinder to the earth and its inhabitants.

4. Animal Welfare Concerns - I'm an animal lover. I grew up on a small farm, so I am fully aware that the animals commonly used as food sources have unique personalities and temperaments just like anyone's family dog or cat. I am horrified at how animals are treated and slaughtered on the mega-corporate feed lots. It's plain disgusting and wrong. I don't want to support evil.

5. Spiritual Benefits - Similar to my hope for mental and emotional clarity, I think that a veg diet will remove a lot of obstacles in my spiritual path. I am all about consciously improving and integrating myself.

6. Economic Concerns- This concern is two-fold. I would like to save money on my family's grocery bill and consider a veg diet to be the easiest way of doing this while not supporting industrial animals-as-food complexes.

 

"b) You can be veg and be very, very unhealthy. Veg means you don't eat meat. It doesn't automatically mean you eat healthy. "

 

Yes, I have met several individuals who are veg, but who are seriously unhealthy and do not eat a balanced diet. I think this was also the issue when I tried vegetarianism many years ago - I simply ate a lot of veggie junk food and didn't get nearly the variety of veggies that I do now. Especially since I've been growing my own organic veggies for about 4 years now.


c) If you're concerned about what people think, give up now. Seriously. Most people are threatened by things that are foreign to them and their defense mechanism is to attack, or at the very least, question it.

 

Oh, I do lots of things that are foreign to others and generally live an unconventional life. But, I won't lie and say that other people don't affect me - they do. Let's face it, being veg means that you have to be more vigilant about what you put in your mouth than our omnivorous friends and family.

 

d) If you want to do veg right, you have to educate yourself about nutrition. Actually, let me rephrase that...If you want to be healthy, whether you're veg or not, you have to educate yourself about nutrition. 

 

I'm okay with that - it's a big reason I am here and asking questions.

 

e) If you carry the right veg diet, you will be able to eat all you want and not gain weight. Tested and proven. Period.

 

Excellent. I look forward to finding that right veg diet.

 

g) Lastly in regards to cost, you're not looking at the big picture. If you adopt the right veg diet, you are INVESTING in avoiding diseases like heart disease, diabetes and cancer. How much does your health cost?

 

Oh dear. As of right now, the only thing "wrong" with me is that I'm fat. I know that being fat leads to other more serious diseases. I rarely, if ever get sick. My skin is clear and my hair is thick and shiny. My eyesight is good, I do not wear corrective lenses. I take no medications, nor am I being treated for or managing any diseases. I would say my health is pretty awesome in a lot of respects, but I'm always looking for ways to improve.

I don't have a trust fund and I'm an underemployed student; while I certainly don't want to develop a host of nasty diseases, I don't have the luxury of spending great sums of money in pursuit of health. This is part of the reason I took up growing my own veggies - not only do I get to enjoy bees and hummingbirds, but I get fresh, organic food. Sorry, but I live in the real world where I don't have carte blanche to spend thousands of dollars at Whole Paycheck, or on personal trainers and private chefs, etc. I'm a grassroots, DIY kinda gal.

 


c) Stop giving a sh*t about what other people think. In time, when you start looking younger, healthier and are able to outperform "regular" people in various capacities, not just physical, I can assure you those questions or concerns will subdue. And as an FYI, it's not rabbit food, it's gorilla food! 

 

I'm not concerned necessarily with what other people "think" about me going veg. I am however, concerned that leading a normal social life: going to dinner at family's homes, attending parties and other social events means that I get to be the odd one out because there isn't anything for me to eat. It's a fact of life that when humans gather for social events, food is put in the spotlight. I don't think I should have to apologize for not wanting to be a special snowflake for my SIL or my mother when I come over for dinner.

 

d) If you eat a diet primarily based of raw fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts and sprouted legumes with some added super foods, you will look and feel like superman. You will not be overweight, you won't have skin blemishes, you won't feel tired...you will achieve your perfect weight, you will have radiant skin and will start looking younger than ever, you will sleep 5-6 hours and have abundant energy throughout the day with no flat spots and you will have much greater mental clarity and a much higher sense of emotional wellbeing.  

 

I look forward to experiencing that myself.

 

e) There is no free lunch. You have to lean how to look at what you eat as fuel and not the addiction to the palate that it is for most people. You have to invest time to educate yourself. You have to not care what people think and stand by your beliefs. 

 

This will be a challenge for me as I fully realize that I have some food addictions in place. I have a raging sweet tooth and a definite sugar addiction. I have finally kicked my coffee addiction and have given up caffeine with the exception of green tea, since its benefits outweigh any costs associated with caffeine consumption.

 

Thanks for your advice - you actually helped me to galvanize some of my thoughts around transitioning to a veg diet.

 

TH

Hi TH, 

 

I think you're much farther ahead than what your original post alluded to based on your last response. You certainly have valid concerns and my opinions and suggestions are based on years of my personal experience and observation. As a veg, I've been unhealthy, overweight and have had to deal with the social implications of my diet. It's during my 30s that I've finally clued into how to optimize my diet despite the fact that I grew up in a veg household that had a lot of knowledge about nutrition and natural medicine. So, here's some further input: 

 

Underlining reasons for going veg:

You certainly have a good understanding of the higher merits of going veg. Some people think going veg is a magic pill to become healthy. It's not. As we both agree, you can be seriously unhealthy under a veg diet. 

 

Food addictions:

We all have (had) food addictions. It's difficult not to when we live in a society that is bombarded by advertising messages and a good measure of those are for food catering strictly to the palate. I used to looooove pizza, ice cream, nachos...basically everything and anything with cheese and get raging cravings. So firstly, congrats on quitting coffee. It's terrible for you. It leaches out all the vitamins and minerals out of your body. Secondly, a year ago, I did the Master Cleanse for the first time (not my first cleanse though) and afterward, I was so impressed I committed to doing it every six months for the rest of my life. It is a fantastic way to detoxify your body and reset your palate. When I think of foods like pizza and ice cream now, I get nauseous. There is another bonus that is pertinent to you...massive weight loss in a relatively fast period of time. I highly recommend you look into this. Pick up Tom Woloshyn's book on the Master Cleanse. Highly educational about the merits of the cleanse but also about nutrition and health in general. 

 

Social implications: 

This is a stylistic thing but here is my input: If you make your diet a non-issue for others, they will relax and stop asking questions. I've had my share of exposure to questions (out of curiosity, not interest) and put downs over the years. A lot of people are apprehensive toward vegs because many are preachy and like to impose their beliefs on others. When someone asks me why I'm veg, I usually just say that it's for philosophical reasons and leave it at that. If anyone asks if it's for animal rights reasons, I say "not entirely" and say that it's a very personal thing and I respect other people's choices. That diffuses any threat that people might be feeling. It's crazy but just the fact that you don't eat meat makes some people feel threatened. There are very few instances when I've gone to a restaurant or someone's home and not been able to eat something. A month and a half ago, I went 100% raw vegan and had similar concerns regarding the social aspect. I've since had two business lunch meetings and have gone out to restaurants with friends a handful of times with no issues. Every restaurant had salad.  

 

Costs: 

You are further ahead that you might think. That's awesome that you have your own garden and grow your own veggies. If you focus on a primarily raw diet of fruits and veggies, you will not only be healthier (you're eating live foods not dead ones) it shouldn't cost much. I train athletically and I supplement my meals with superfoods which are not cheap so it can be expensive once you want to take your performance to the next level but you can do just fine on veggies, fruit, seeds and some nuts, all of which is relatively cheap. 

 

I strongly recommend you look into raw foods and the master cleanse as a way to achieve your objectives. Be prepared for detox. As I said before, there is no free lunch. However, I can assure you that you have the ability to transform your body and your life in general in fairly short order if you commit to it. 

 

Best of luck! 

 


TLH said:

Hi LJ,

I appreciate your note, and thought you deserved a direct answer to your questions and thoughts.

 

"After reading your post I have one burning question...why do you want to be veg???"

I have several macro-level reasons for wanting to go veg. Some may sound a little "weird" but here it is:

1. Health Reasons - I really want to be in peak physical condition. I am preparing for a physically demanding career and am frankly sick and tired of being fat, tired, and in pain.

2. Mental Clarity - I practice yoga, and let's face it, most of the yoga teachers and paths recommend a veg diet, if not outright demand it. I love the freedom from the emotional and mental ups and downs that yoga brings me - I want to see if a veg diet will further enhance those benefits.

3. Environmental Concerns - I have read plenty of articles from Vegetarian Times and lots of books like "Diet for a New America" that have convinced me that a veg diet is kinder to the earth and its inhabitants.

4. Animal Welfare Concerns - I'm an animal lover. I grew up on a small farm, so I am fully aware that the animals commonly used as food sources have unique personalities and temperaments just like anyone's family dog or cat. I am horrified at how animals are treated and slaughtered on the mega-corporate feed lots. It's plain disgusting and wrong. I don't want to support evil.

5. Spiritual Benefits - Similar to my hope for mental and emotional clarity, I think that a veg diet will remove a lot of obstacles in my spiritual path. I am all about consciously improving and integrating myself.

6. Economic Concerns- This concern is two-fold. I would like to save money on my family's grocery bill and consider a veg diet to be the easiest way of doing this while not supporting industrial animals-as-food complexes.

 

"b) You can be veg and be very, very unhealthy. Veg means you don't eat meat. It doesn't automatically mean you eat healthy. "

 

Yes, I have met several individuals who are veg, but who are seriously unhealthy and do not eat a balanced diet. I think this was also the issue when I tried vegetarianism many years ago - I simply ate a lot of veggie junk food and didn't get nearly the variety of veggies that I do now. Especially since I've been growing my own organic veggies for about 4 years now.


c) If you're concerned about what people think, give up now. Seriously. Most people are threatened by things that are foreign to them and their defense mechanism is to attack, or at the very least, question it.

 

Oh, I do lots of things that are foreign to others and generally live an unconventional life. But, I won't lie and say that other people don't affect me - they do. Let's face it, being veg means that you have to be more vigilant about what you put in your mouth than our omnivorous friends and family.

 

d) If you want to do veg right, you have to educate yourself about nutrition. Actually, let me rephrase that...If you want to be healthy, whether you're veg or not, you have to educate yourself about nutrition. 

 

I'm okay with that - it's a big reason I am here and asking questions.

 

e) If you carry the right veg diet, you will be able to eat all you want and not gain weight. Tested and proven. Period.

 

Excellent. I look forward to finding that right veg diet.

 

g) Lastly in regards to cost, you're not looking at the big picture. If you adopt the right veg diet, you are INVESTING in avoiding diseases like heart disease, diabetes and cancer. How much does your health cost?

 

Oh dear. As of right now, the only thing "wrong" with me is that I'm fat. I know that being fat leads to other more serious diseases. I rarely, if ever get sick. My skin is clear and my hair is thick and shiny. My eyesight is good, I do not wear corrective lenses. I take no medications, nor am I being treated for or managing any diseases. I would say my health is pretty awesome in a lot of respects, but I'm always looking for ways to improve.

I don't have a trust fund and I'm an underemployed student; while I certainly don't want to develop a host of nasty diseases, I don't have the luxury of spending great sums of money in pursuit of health. This is part of the reason I took up growing my own veggies - not only do I get to enjoy bees and hummingbirds, but I get fresh, organic food. Sorry, but I live in the real world where I don't have carte blanche to spend thousands of dollars at Whole Paycheck, or on personal trainers and private chefs, etc. I'm a grassroots, DIY kinda gal.

 


c) Stop giving a sh*t about what other people think. In time, when you start looking younger, healthier and are able to outperform "regular" people in various capacities, not just physical, I can assure you those questions or concerns will subdue. And as an FYI, it's not rabbit food, it's gorilla food! 

 

I'm not concerned necessarily with what other people "think" about me going veg. I am however, concerned that leading a normal social life: going to dinner at family's homes, attending parties and other social events means that I get to be the odd one out because there isn't anything for me to eat. It's a fact of life that when humans gather for social events, food is put in the spotlight. I don't think I should have to apologize for not wanting to be a special snowflake for my SIL or my mother when I come over for dinner.

 

d) If you eat a diet primarily based of raw fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts and sprouted legumes with some added super foods, you will look and feel like superman. You will not be overweight, you won't have skin blemishes, you won't feel tired...you will achieve your perfect weight, you will have radiant skin and will start looking younger than ever, you will sleep 5-6 hours and have abundant energy throughout the day with no flat spots and you will have much greater mental clarity and a much higher sense of emotional wellbeing.  

 

I look forward to experiencing that myself.

 

e) There is no free lunch. You have to lean how to look at what you eat as fuel and not the addiction to the palate that it is for most people. You have to invest time to educate yourself. You have to not care what people think and stand by your beliefs. 

 

This will be a challenge for me as I fully realize that I have some food addictions in place. I have a raging sweet tooth and a definite sugar addiction. I have finally kicked my coffee addiction and have given up caffeine with the exception of green tea, since its benefits outweigh any costs associated with caffeine consumption.

 

Thanks for your advice - you actually helped me to galvanize some of my thoughts around transitioning to a veg diet.

 

TH

Thanks again for your helpful response, LJ.

So when you realized that you weren't really rocking a healthy diet in your 30's, did you quit cold turkey (no pun intended) and straight to a raw vegan diet? Or did you gradually subtract and add to your diet until you got things just right?

 

About social activities- it's sort of funny, but I get the impression that most of my partner's and my families eat pretty simply when it is just them at home. They use the excuse of us coming over for dinner as an excuse to make something elaborate and frequently expensive. Most of our respective relatives are huge foodies and oenophiles, and so turning up for a dinner party where someone has spent hours preparing peking duck or prime rib or paella seems, I don't know - rude? insulting? inhospitable? ungrateful? Is this why coming out to family and friends as a veggie is so important? So they know it's all me and nothing to do with their skills in the kitchen?

 

I'm also curious if it makes more sense to slowly work my way to vegan or raw vegan or to just go for it 100%. I've been looking at getting Kathy Frester's Veganist book as a noobie guide to making the switch.

 

Also, I've done some pretty hardcore detoxes and cleanses in the past, though I've never done the Master Cleanse. The one detox I had the best results with was designed by Dr. Mark Hyman. The smoothies and soup were all free of common allergens and everything was chosen for their detoxifying properties. There were also a number of supplements and other regimens including dry brushing of the skin twice a day for maximum detox. I did it for 21 days and felt clean as a whistle when it was all over. If you say the Master cleanse is all that, then I suppose I should look into it.

 

Yes, cold turkey. :) I used the cleanse to make the transition. That's just me. Gradual changes don't work for me and I've never known anyone to be fully successful with slow transitions.

 

Yes, people can take your dietary decisions very personally. It's insane when you think about it logically but it happens nonetheless. So, sharing a story in a manner that is honest but equally respectful of your family/friends is important. You might even want to focus on one particular aspect of your reasons like "health" and simply say that meat products don't sit well with you. Nobody will expect you to eat something that makes you feel bad. 

 

I highly recommend you look into the Master Cleanse. Pick up the book I suggested. At the very least, you will learn more about health. Then commit to doing the cleanse and use that to transition into veg. Worse case, you decide it's not for you and you go back to your regular diet. At the very least you will have given your body a good break and you will loose a good number of lbs. If you decide to do the MC, make sure you pay keen attention to the quality of the ingredients and the recipe. Also, try to go for at least 15 days and anything between three to four weeks is ideal. The 10 day minimum is that...a minimum and not optimal. Be prepared for detox!!!

 

Hope this helps. 

Do they specify which kind of lemons to use for the MC? I grow my own organic meyer lemons and have a ton of them! I'm pretty sure I can find the Grade B maple syrup and organic cayenne pepper powder is a snap to find. I use a Brita filter for my drinking water. Is that good, or do they recommend switching to distilled water for the duration of the cleanse?
Your lemons are perfect. Brita works. Take as much cayenne as you can handle. :)

Last night I read the original Master Cleanse document by Stanley Burroughs. While all the mentions of god and the derisive references to witchcraft are weirding me out, there are a lot of similarities between MC and Ayurvedic medicine. For instance, both systems praise the lemon for its multi-faceted healing properties and both systems also cite mucous ("ama" in Sanskrit) as the most pernicious threat to human health. In fact, Ayurvedic practitioners would see the heat of the cayenne as being the perfect medicine to melt congestion (Kapha), while lemons are recommended for all doshas.

The similarities seem to end there. Ayurveda thinks dairy (ghee especially) and honey are nature's medicine, while Stanley seems to think they are practically poison. Interesting.

I also visited Tom Woloshyn's website and see that contrary to his mentor, he sees a fast of 10-14 days perfectly adequate.

I've never read up on Stanley Burroughs but I'm equally turned off from things that start straying too much off topic. Similarly, Tom's book makes some references that I didn't particularly find necessary but I didn't let that get in the way of the other logical arguments he makes in his book about cleansing.

 

As for dairy and honey, I don't particularly have anything against honey but in my research and personal experience, dairy is absolutely one of the worse things one can consume. It also doesn't make sense to consume a substance that is specifically produced to feed young offspring, especially of another species and especially as an adult. Dig a little deeper.

 

As for the cleansing period, my recommendations were based on information i came upon about the detox stages and time frames while fasting/cleansing in general. They were not specific to the MC. My takeaway was that at 10 days, your body is just getting used to the cleansing process (like jogging for 20mins to lose weight, your body is just getting ready to burn fat at that point) and that at 14-16 days is when the deep cleansing starts. Detoxing then comes and goes in waves and the ideal time to stop is when one is on a rest cycle, the symptoms of which are a pink tongue and a general feeling of wellness. Again, 21-28 days was the sweet spot to maximize the effectiveness of a fast/cleanse.  

 

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